How to Pass the VCP-NV 2023 Exam: Tips and Resources

Get tips and resources for passing the VCP-NV 2023 exam, including Pluralsight courses, VMware Hands On Labs, home lab practice, and study materials.

If you’re preparing for the VCP-NV 2023 exam, also known as 2V0-41.20, you might wonder what resources can help you pass. As someone who recently passed the exam, I want to share some of the study resources I used and my tips for success.

Pluralsight

One of the best resources I found was the Pluralsight course, VCP-NV 2022: VMware Certified Professional – Network Virtualization (2V0-41.20). This eight-hour course provides a comprehensive overview of networking concepts and includes labs you can follow. I found this course helpful because it explained how things were done differently in NSX-T compared to previous versions.

Hands-On Labs

If you don’t have the resources to run a full NSX implementation in your home lab, I highly recommend using VMware Hands On Labs. This free resource is a great way to learn by doing.

Using Your Home lab

I spent a lot of time practicing with NSX in my home lab. This allowed me to get hands-on experience with the platform and learn how things work in a production environment. I even found a way to install NSX from vCenter that wasn’t covered in the Pluralsight course.

Practice Exams

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any official practice exams. Instead, I made notes on everything listed in the exam guide and watched resources like vBrownBag‘s YouTube video on NSX-T. Even though the video was for a previous version, many of the concepts were still relevant.

Conclusion

In conclusion, these study resources were invaluable in helping me pass the VCP-NV 2023 exam. I hope they can be of service to you as well. Remember to practice and study consistently, and you’ll be on your way to passing the exam.

Common Issues Using Azure Migrate

I have been running a VMware home lab with an old Dell PowerEdge R720 with ESXi 7.0.2 installed. I have been running Azure for backups and Key Vault to protect secrets, but now I want to migrate one of my vSphere on-prem VMs. Through this process, I ran into a few issues and “gotchas” that may affect other users. Below is my list of potential issues you may face and how to resolve them.

A Note About Whether or Not to Use the Migration Appliance

I started out choosing to use the migration appliance. I downloaded the OVA and installed it in my lab environment. This initially turned out to be a huge hog of resources without any real benefit for my small lab environment. For that reason, when my project would not allow me to add the migration tool and I had to create a new project, I decided to go with the PowerShell script install on an existing server. If you decide to do the same, remember that you must use a Windows Server OS.

Issue 1: Azure Migration Project Tool Will Not Add to Your Dashboard

This was a random issue. Your Azure Migrate project has access to the free assessment tool and the free migration tool. A functioning project should look like the image below.

A functioning project with the migration tool added

But the first interaction of my project would not allow me to add that tool. I searched the message boards and could not find a solution to my problem. So, I did the next best thing and started a new project.

Issue 2: The x86 version of VC++ Redist 2019 may cause the gateway service to fail

This issue is specific to using the PowerShell version instead of the virtual appliance. This was a problem for me because I had both the x86 and x64 versions of VC++ Redist 2019 installed on my Server VM as shown below.

I searched for the problem on the internet and found this post in Microsoft’s forum. The advice given was to uninstall both versions, but in my case, that just caused another issue. The solution that worked best for me was to only uninstall the x86 version. Once done, the installation was completed successfully.

Issue 3: Insufficient Cores Available in the Subscription (During the migration prechecks)

I worked my way through all the other issues and then ran into this one.

I had enough cores available in the normal compute SKUs, so this one confused me a bit. The issue, in this case, is that I did an assessment, and used the assessment settings to determine the compute SKU I was going to use but did not properly modify the settings in my assessment. Once I removed reserved instances from my assessment and recalculated the assessment, I got a normal compute SKU and was able to complete my migration successfully.

Conclusion

While the Azure Migrate tool may not be as easy to use as some of the paid tools, it can be very useful if you are cost-constrained.

How to Resolve Connection Errors Between Horizon and vCenter

Learn how to resolve connection errors between Horizon and vCenter with our step-by-step guide. Follow our troubleshooting steps to get your virtual desktop infrastructure running smoothly.

I was recently working with a client that needed me to migrate Horizon View VMs to new storage. I thought it would be as easy as changing the storage settings for the pool and performing a rebalance across the cluster. Unfortunately, no rebalance operation was successful and I saw the following errors:

Provisioning error occurred for Machine XXX: Refit operation rebalance failed

vCenter at address <vCenter Address> has been temporarily disabled (this error would typically followed by another notification that the same vCenter had been enabled)

I was able to resolve the issue by following VMware KB 1030996. I the case of this customer there was only one working production pool. To test that there was an issue with the pool in use, I created a new temporary pool. I then tried recompose actions and looked for errors in the event log. There were none.

Creating a new temporary pool proved critical to resolving this issue. The crux of the problem as laid out in the KB is that there are two vCenter entries in the composer database. In my case the IP address and the FQDN (The FQDN being the correct entry). The correct Deployment Group ID was displayed in the View Composer Database entry for the new temporary pool I created. I was able to take that ID and replace it in the entries for the current production pool. After that was done, I was able to easily rebalance the production pool.   

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